Seining on the Jekyll Beach

Seining on the Jekyll Island Beach
Seining

Seining refers to a method of fishing.  Imagine a 4 foot by 20 foot net, attached to poles on either end. The bottom edge is weighted so that it sits just above the ground. Two people each take a pole and pull the net through the water, catching fish, shrimp, crabs, and other ocean animals in the process.  People have used this method of fishing for thousands of years.  The length of the nets varies, and you can also seine using boats.
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Knobbed Whelk – Georgia’s State Seashell

Knobbed Whelk Jekyll Island
Knobbed Whelk Appearance

Georgia’s Knobbed Whelk has six spirals radiating outwards, with points or knobs around the top. Its shell consists of white, brown, and grey colors, with an orange mouth. If the shell is alive, its glass-like brown foot will cover the shell opening. The Knobbed Whelk is right-handed. Hold the shell in your right hand with the spiral pointing up and the opening facing you. If you point your thumb up you can imagine the fingers of your right hand sticking into the whelk shell’s opening. The Lightning Whelk is a left-handed whelk which looks very similar to the Knobbed Whelk. It is the only left-handed whelk that lives near Jekyll’s shores.

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Sand Dollars – Beachcombing on Jekyll Island

Sea Urchins

The Sand dollar is a flat member of the sea urchin family.  All sea urchins are roughly circular in shape and have a hard skeleton called a test.  Live sand dollars have a test covered in velvety, hair-like spins. A sand dollar uses these spins to capture food particles and to move the food to its mouth on the bottom of its body. Seagulls are the most common sand dollar prey.

Handling a sand dollar is not harmful to you or the sea urchin. Sand dollars have a five-petaled design visible on the top of their exoskeleton. They are often found on the east-facing beaches on Jekyll Island near the waterline.
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A Walk to the Southernmost Point – Hiking on Jekyll Island

St. Andrews Beach

Walking from the St. Andrews Beach parking lot to the southernmost point of Jekyll is one of our favorite hikes on the island. On this walk you’ll see Little Cumberland Island, gorgeous stretches of Georgia beach, the mast of a buried shrimp boat, and you’ll likely see many shore birds. The round trip from the parking lot along the beach to the shipwreck and back is a little over a mile. But you might want to increase the distance of the hike by walking further along beach.

The St. Andrews Picnic Area parking lot is located off of Riverview Dr. on the southwest side of the island. Our usual route has us heading to the beach and turning left or south. Follow the coast until you see mast of the sunken shrimp boat. You can also take a short detour north from the parking lot to a lookout tower that provides a nice view.
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